COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions

Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital Is Monitoring the Coronavirus Situation Very Closely

For more information about the steps we are taking in preparation of COVID-19 please visit our dedicated COVID-19 Preparations page. Here you can read our letter from Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital CEO, John Bishop regarding the preparations we have in place for COVID-19.

We greatly appreciate your patience and understanding as we all work together to ensure the overall safety of our friends and neighbors. Please continue to check CDC.gov for the most current information regarding COVID-19.

COVID-19: Frequently Asked Questions

How Does COVID-19 Spread?


How Does COVID-19 Spread?

According to the CDC, the virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to spread mainly from person to person, mainly through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Spread is more likely when people are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in many affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

What Is Community Spread?


What Is Community Spread?

According to the CDC, community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.

Can Someone Who Has Had COVID-19 Spread the Illness to Others?


Can Someone Who Has Had COVID-19 Spread the Illness to Others?

According to the CDC, the virus that causes COVID-19 is spreading from person-to-person. People are thought to be most contagious when they are symptomatic (the sickest). That is why CDC recommends that these patients be isolated either in the hospital or at home (depending on how sick they are) until they are better and no longer pose a risk of infecting others. More recently the virus has also been detected in asymptomatic persons.

How long someone is actively sick can vary so the decision on when to release someone from isolation is made using a test-based or non-test-based strategy (i.e. time since illness started and time since recovery) in consultation with state and local public health officials. The decision involves considering the specifics of each situation, including disease severity, illness signs and symptoms, and the results of laboratory testing for that patient.

Can Someone Who Has Been Quarantined for COVID-19 Spread the Illness to Others?


Can Someone Who Has Been Quarantined for COVID-19 Spread the Illness to Others?

According to the CDC, quarantine means separating a person or group of people who have been exposed to a contagious disease but have not developed illness (symptoms) from others who have not been exposed, in order to prevent the possible spread of that disease. Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure because the incubation period for this virus is 2 to 14 days. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

Can the Virus That Causes COVID-19 Be Spread Through Food, Including Restaurant Take Out, Refrigerated or Frozen Packaged Food?


Can the Virus That Causes COVID-19 Be Spread Through Food, Including Restaurant Take Out, Refrigerated or Frozen Packaged Food?

According to the CDC, coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person to person through respiratory droplets. Currently, there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day use a tissue to cover your coughing or sneezing, and wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object, like a packaging container, that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging.

Will Warm Weather Stop the Outbreak of COVID-19?


Will Warm Weather Stop the Outbreak of COVID-19?

According to the CDC, generally coronaviruses survive for shorter periods at higher temperatures and higher humidity than in cooler or dryer environments. However, we don’t have direct data for this virus, nor do we have direct data for a temperature-based cutoff for inactivation at this point. The necessary temperature would also be based on the materials of the surface, the environment, etc. Regardless of temperature please follow CDC’s guidance for cleaning and disinfection.

Can Mosquitoes or Ticks Spread the Virus That Causes COVID-19?


Can Mosquitoes or Ticks Spread the Virus That Causes COVID-19?

According to the CDC, at this time, CDC has no data to suggest that this new coronavirus or other similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way that COVID-19 spreads is from person to person. See How Coronavirus Spreads for more information.

What Are the Symptoms and Complications That COVID-19 Can Cause?


What Are the Symptoms and Complications That COVID-19 Can Cause?

According to the CDC, current symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included mild to severe respiratory illness with fever1, cough, and difficulty breathing. Read more about COVID-19 Symptoms.

Who Is at Higher Risk for Serious Illness From COVID-19?


Who Is at Higher Risk for Serious Illness From COVID-19?

According to the CDC, COVID-19 is a new disease and there is limited information regarding risk factors for severe disease. Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based on what we know now, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 are:

People of all ages with underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, including:

  • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
  • People who have serious heart conditions
  • People who are immunocompromised
    • Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, smoking, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications
  • People with severe obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥40)
  • People with diabetes
  • People with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis
  • People with liver disease

What Should People at Higher Risk of Serious Illness With COVID-19 Do?


What Should People at Higher Risk of Serious Illness With COVID-19 Do?

According to the CDC, if you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should:

  • Stock up on supplies
  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick
  • Limit close contact and wash your hands often
  • Avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel

If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. More information on how to prepare, what to do if you get sick, and how communities and caregivers can support those at higher risk is available on the CDC's page People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19.

How Were the Underlying Conditions for People Considered Higher Risk of Serious Illness With COVID-19 Selected?


How Were the Underlying Conditions for People Considered Higher Risk of Serious Illness With COVID-19 Selected?

According to the CDC, this list is based on:

  • What we are learning from the outbreak in other countries and in the United States.
  • What we know about risk from other respiratory infections, like flu.

As CDC gets more information about COVID-19 cases here in the United States, we will update this list as needed.

Are There Any Medications I Should Avoid Taking if I Have COVID-19?


Are There Any Medications I Should Avoid Taking if I Have COVID-19?

According to the CDC, currently, there is no evidence to show that taking ibuprofen or naproxen can lead to a more severe infection of COVID-19.

People with high blood pressure should take their blood pressure medications, as directed, and work with their healthcare provider to make sure that their blood pressure is as well controlled as possible. Any changes to your medications should only be made by your healthcare provider.

What About Underlying Medical Conditions That Are Not Included on This List?


What About Underlying Medical Conditions That Are Not Included on This List?

According to the CDC, based on available information, adults aged 65 years and older and people of any age with underlying medical conditions included on this list are at higher risk for severe illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. CDC is collecting and analyzing data regularly and will update the list when we learn more. People with underlying medical conditions not on the list might also be at higher risk and should consult with their healthcare provider if they are concerned.

The CDC encourages all people, regardless of risk, to:

  • Take steps to protect yourself and others.
  • Call your healthcare provider if you are sick with a fever, cough, or shortness of breath.
  • Follow CDC travel guidelines and the recommendations of your state and local health officials.

What Does a Well-Controlled Health Condition Mean?


What Does a Well-Controlled Health Condition Mean?

According to the CDC, generally, well-controlled means that your condition is stable, not life-threatening, and laboratory assessments and other findings are as similar as possible to those without the health condition. You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

What Does More Severe Illness Mean?


What Does More Severe Illness Mean?

According to the CDC, severity typically means how much impact the illness or condition has on your body’s function. You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

Are People With Disabilities at Higher Risk?


Are People With Disabilities at Higher Risk?

According to the CDC, most people with disabilities are not inherently at higher risk for becoming infected with or having severe illness from COVID-19. Some people with physical limitations or other disabilities might be at a higher risk of infection because of their underlying medical condition.

  • People with certain disabilities might experience higher rates of chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk of serious illness and poorer outcomes from COVID-19. Adults with disabilities are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke, diabetes, or cancer than adults without disabilities.

You should talk with your healthcare provider if you have a question about your health or how your health condition is being managed.

Do We Have COVID-19 at Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital?


Do We Have COVID-19 at Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital?

Due to patient privacy regulations, Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital is not allowed to share information. The Montana Department of Health and Human Services is tracking COVID-19 activity in the state. Information is updated daily on their website.

Does Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital Have a Test for COVID-19?


Does Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital Have a Test for COVID-19?

COVID-19 testing is not physically performed at Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital or its medical clinics. Your medical provider and Ravalli County Public Health will work together to determine if testing is appropriate. Specimen collection requires special coordination.

I Woke Up Feeling Sick; Do I Have COVID-19?


I Woke Up Feeling Sick; Do I Have COVID-19?

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “.. if you think have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider for medical advice.

How Can I Get Tested for COVID-19?


How Can I Get Tested for COVID-19?

If you think have been exposed to COVID-19 and develop a fever and symptoms, such as cough or difficulty breathing, call your healthcare provider; tell them about your signs, symptoms and recent travel or contact.

According to Montana.Gov and the Department of Public Health and Human Services: Healthcare providers and local county health contacts are asked to work with patients of interest to assist with assessment and facilitate COVID-19 testing when indicated.

How Can I Help Prevent the Spread of COVID-19?


How Can I Help Prevent the Spread of COVID-19?

To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, or other communicable respiratory illnesses, you can take simple steps to protect yourself, your family and the community:

Protecting Yourself:
  • Clean your hands often with soap and water or alcohol based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
Steps to Protect Others if You are Sick:
  • Stay home.
  • Cover your cough and sneezes with the crook of your elbow or a tissue.
  • Wear a face mask when around others.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently-touched objects and surfaces using a regular.
  • household cleaning spray or wipe.

Should I Wear a Face Mask?


Should I Wear a Face Mask?

There is no need to wear a face mask unless you have symptoms of an airborne infectious disease or are in prolonged close contact (about 3 feet) with a contagious person. Outside of these circumstances, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) does not recommend that members of the general public use a face mask.

Events

  • Marcus Daly Memorial Hospital Blood Drive

    Blood Drive! 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM Please call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit RedCross.org and enter: marcusdaly to schedule an appointment

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